Should Quilt Binding Be Sewn on the Front or Back?

This is a question that’s puzzled many quilters throughout the years. There are arguments for both approaches, with some preferring to sew the binding on the front for a clean and polished look, while others believe that sewing it on the back provides a stronger and more durable finish. That's where Madeira Aerolock Premium Serger thread comes in. This top-quality, core-spun thread is guaranteed to withstand frequent washes and strain, making it the perfect choice for binding quilts. Made of 100% polyester, this thread is specifically designed for use with sergers, overlock machines, and coverlock machines like the Janome CoverPro family.

Can You Hand Sew Binding to Front of a Quilt?

When it comes to binding a quilt, there’s often a debate about whether it should be sewn on the front or the back. While machine sewing is the most popular method, some quilters prefer to hand sew their bindings for a more traditional look. But can you hand sew a binding to the front of a quilt? The answer is yes! Hand sewing can be a relaxing and satisfying way to finish off a quilt.

One thread that’s highly recommended for hand sewing binding is Madeira Aerolock Premium Serger thread. This top-quality thread is made of 100% core-spun polyester, which gives it excellent strength and durability. It’s designed to withstand frequent washes and strain, making it perfect for binding quilts that will be used and loved for years to come.

Madeira Aerolock Premium Serger thread is particularly well-suited for sergers/overlock and coverlock machines, such as the Janome CoverPro family of machines. These machines require a strong and reliable thread that can handle the speed and tension of their operations. Madeira Aerolock Premium Serger thread is specifically engineered to meet these requirements, ensuring smooth and professional results every time.

The thread is available in a wide range of colors, allowing quilters to match or contrast their binding to their quilt top. The threads superior stitchability and low lint design make it easy to work with and help prevent any tangling or breakage while sewing.

Whether you choose to sew your binding on the front or the back, using this top-quality thread will ensure that your quilt lasts for generations to come.

Tips and Techniques for Hand Sewing Binding to the Front of a Quilt

When it comes to hand sewing binding to the front of a quilt, there are a few tips and techniques that can help ensure a clean and professional-looking finish.

First, start by preparing your binding strips. Cut them to the desired width and join the strips together to create one long piece. Fold the strip in half lengthwise and press it with an iron to create a neat crease.

To attach the binding to the front of the quilt, align the raw edges of the binding with the raw edges of the quilt. Pin or clip the binding in place, making sure it’s evenly distributed around the quilt.

Next, sew the binding to the quilt using a small whipstitch or ladder stitch. Start at one corner and work your way around the entire quilt, stitching through all layers. Take care to catch only a small amount of fabric with each stitch to create a nearly invisible seam.

When you reach a corner, fold the binding to create a mitered corner. This can be done by folding the binding up and away from the quilt at a 45-degree angle and then folding it back down to align with the next side of the quilt. Secure the corner with a few extra stitches to keep it in place.

Once all four corners are mitered and the binding is stitched down, fold it over to the back of the quilt. The folded edge should align with the stitching line on the front. Secure the binding to the back of the quilt using a blind stitch or ladder stitch.

With careful attention to detail and some practice, sewing binding to the front of a quilt can yield beautiful and professional results. Remember to take your time and enjoy the process!

Conclusion

Ultimately, the decision should be based on the individual quilter's vision for their quilt.

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