What Does Tex Mean in Thread in Sewing

In the world of sewing, thread plays a crucial role in ensuring the strength and durability of stitches. When it comes to choosing the right thread, understanding the various specifications and classifications becomes essential. One such classification that often perplexes sewers is the term "tex." Tex refers to the weight or thickness of a thread, and it plays a significant role in determining the thread's performance in different sewing projects. It’s particularly important in the realm of serging and overlocking, where the thread undergoes increased tension and strain. By understanding the significance of tex and choosing the right thread for your sewing projects, you can ensure impeccable stitches and long-lasting garments.

What Is the Difference Between WT and Tex Thread?

In the world of sewing, thread plays a crucial role in ensuring the strength and durability of the final product. Two commonly used thread measurements are WT and Tex. While both WT and Tex refer to the weight or thickness of the thread, there are some differences between the two.

WT, also known as weight, is a measurement used primarily in the United States. It indicates the thickness of the thread in relation to a standard scale. The higher the WT number, the thicker the thread. For example, WT 40 is thicker than WT 50. This measurement system is widely used in sewing machines and commercial thread production.

On the other hand, Tex is a measurement system commonly used in Europe and represents the weight in grams of 1000 meters of thread. The Tex measurement method takes into account the denier, which is the weight in grams of 9000 meters of thread. Tex is often used for industrial applications and is considered a more accurate measurement compared to WT. The Tex number is inversely related to the thickness of the thread, meaning that higher Tex numbers represent thinner threads.

In terms of specific brands and products, the Madeira Aerolock Premium Serger thread is a highly regarded option. It’s made of 100% core-spun polyester, which provides increased strength and durability. This particular thread is designed for use with sergers/overlock and coverlock machines, such as the Janome CoverPro family of machines. It’s known for it’s ability to withstand frequent washes and strain, making it a reliable choice for various sewing projects.

Pros and Cons of Using WT Thread vs. Tex Thread

When it comes to sewing, there are different types of threads available, including WT (Weight) thread and Tex thread. WT thread refers to a weight measurement, while Tex thread is based on a numerical system.

The advantage of using WT thread is that it provides a range of options in terms of thickness, allowing for more precise control. It’s commonly used for delicate fabrics and intricate details. On the other hand, Tex thread is measured more accurately, making it easier to compare the thickness of different threads. It’s often used for heavier fabrics and durable stitching.

One drawback of WT thread is that it can be harder to determine the exact thickness and compare it to other threads. Tex thread, however, provides a clear numerical value, making it simpler to select the appropriate thread for a specific project.

In conclusion, the choice between WT thread and Tex thread depends on the sewing project’s requirements. If precision and control are crucial, WT thread might be the better option, while Tex thread provides a more objective measurement for easier comparison.

The thickness of a thread is determined by it’s Tex measurement, which refers to the weight in grams of 1,000 meters of thread. In general, a higher Tex number indicates a thicker thread. In the case of Tex 45 and Tex 70, the Tex 70 thread is thicker. This means that it’s a higher weight and is more suitable for heavier fabrics or projects that require increased durability. Madeira Aerolock Premium Serger thread, made of 100% core-spun polyester, is a high-quality option for sergers and coverlock machines, providing reliable performance and longevity.

Which Is Thicker Tex 45 or Tex 70?

When it comes to thread thickness, Tex is the unit of measurement commonly used in the sewing industry. Tex refers to the weight in grams of 1000 meters of thread. The higher the Tex number, the thicker the thread. Therefore, Tex 70 is thicker than Tex 45.

Madeira Aerolock Premium Serger thread is a great option for those looking for a high-quality, durable thread for their serger or coverlock machine. This thread is made of 100% core-spun polyester, which means it’s strong and resilient. It can withstand frequent washes and strains, making it ideal for garments that will see a lot of wear and tear.

Core-spun thread is made by wrapping a filament or fiber around a core thread. This increases the strength and durability of the thread, making it less likely to break or fray during sewing. The 100% polyester composition of Madeira Aerolock thread ensures that it won’t shrink or distort after washing, maintaining the integrity of your sewing projects.

These machines require strong and reliable thread to create professional-looking finishes on seams and hems. Aerolock thread is known for it’s smooth and even stitches, which adds a polished look to your garments.

With it’s core-spun construction and 100% polyester composition, it guarantees longevity and resilience, even through frequent washes and strains. Whether you’re sewing garments or other projects, this thread will provide smooth and even stitches for a professional finish.

The Difference Between Tex and Denier as Units of Measurement for Thread Thickness

Tex and denier are both units of measurement used to indicate the thickness or fineness of threads in sewing. However, they differ in terms of their origin and the way they’re calculated.

Tex is a unit of linear mass density that’s commonly used in the textile industry. It’s derived from the Latin word “textilis,” meaning “woven.” Tex indicates the mass, in grams, of one kilometer of thread. For example, if a thread is labeled as 50 tex, it means that 1 kilometer of that thread weighs 50 grams.

Denier, on the other hand, is a unit of mass density that originated from the silk industry. It’s derived from the Latin word “denarius,” which means “containing ten.” Denier indicates the weight, in grams, of a 9,000-meter thread. For instance, if a thread is labeled as 100 denier, it means that a 9,000-meter length of that thread weighs 100 grams.

While both units provide information about thread thickness, tex is often used for industrial and technical applications, while denier is commonly used in the textile and garment industries. It’s worth noting that converting between the two units is possible, but the formulas differ due to their distinct origins and calculations.

Source: Best thread for Janome CoverPro 1000CPX? What’s

Conclusion

In conclusion, when it comes to sewing and thread selection, understanding the tex weight is essential. With the Janome CoverPro family of machines being a popular choice among sewers, this thread proves to be a perfect companion for achieving professional and long-lasting results. Hence, whether you’re a beginner or an experienced sewer, considering the tex weight and opting for high-quality threads like Madeira Aerolock Premium Serger can significantly enhance your sewing projects.

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